OLD PLYMOUTH . UK
www.oldplymouth.uk
 

  Brian Moseley, Plymouth
Webpage created: June 27, 2018
Webpage updated: June 27, 2018

        

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YORK STREET

York Street used to run up hill from Russell Street to Cobourg Street.  It should be mentioned that the land upon which York Street stood was outside the Borough Wall until it was removed at the beginning of the 19th century.  Nothing remains of York Street today (2018).

Although the highway was shown on an 1820 map of Plymouth, it was then unnamed but York Buildings were nearby.  It first appears as York Street on the same map of 1827 that included Cobourg Street.  It is thought to have taken its name from Frederick Augustus (1763-1827), the "Grand Old Duke of York" and Albany, who was renowned for marching 10,000 men to the top of the hill and back down again during an unsuccessful expedition to Helder in the Netherlands in 1799.  It is presumably not coincidental that York Street ran up hill towards Albany Place.

York Street became a very important entrance to the Town from the Saltash direction in particular.  In August 1852 the Postmaster-General appointed a Branch Post Office at the chemist's shop at Number 64 York Street, belonging to Mr John Wilmot, who had been in business in Plymouth for ten years and had previously served at Waugh's, the chemists to Her Majesty Queen Victoria, in Regent Street in London.

Towards the end of 1933 the Automobile Association and the Plymouth Mercantile Association wrote to Plymouth Borough Council suggesting that York Street should be made a 'one-way street'.

The  Council's answer was to put into place  a programme of road widening and improvements at the bottom end of the road.  These were well under way in January and February 1936 and the eastern side of York Street between the South Western Hotel and William Street was demolished during March that year.  York Street thus remained two-way until the very end.

One of the benefits of this road widening was the official opening at 10.30am on May 1st 1937 of "Plymouth's Newest Inn", The Oporto.

At the corner of York Street with Morley Street was the Co-operative Wholesale Society Limited in 1953.

Numbers 1, 2 and 3 York Street existed but were unoccupied in 1953.  A telephone call box was attached to Number 1.

Number 6 York Street was occupied in 1953 by Mr A Roberts trading as The Art Shop, fancy goods dealers.

Number 6 York Street, the Art Shop, with Numbers 7, 8 and 9,
pictured in June 1951.
  Plymouth City Museum and Art Gallery.

Number 7 York Street was occupied in 1953 by a private resident.

Number 8 York Street was unoccupied in 1953.

Number 9 York Street was occupied in 1953 by Mr William R R Mewton LDSRCS England, dental surgeon.

Number 10 York Street was occupied in 1953 by a private resident.

Number 11 York Street was either empty or derelict in 1953.

Number 12 York Street was occupied in 1953 by Mr Stanley Griffin, funeral director.

Numbers 13 to 17 York Street had been demolished by 1953.

Number 18 York Street was occupied in 1953 by the National Business Agency Limited, business transfer agents, and Mr T W Trobridge, solicitor.

Number 19 York Street was occupied in 1953 by the Co-operative Wholesale Society Limited.

Crossing Oxford Place, Number 20 York Street was occupied in 1953 by Messrs Osborne and Phillips, decorators.

Number 21 York Street was occupied in 1953 by Mr J J Becker, bookseller.

Number 22 York Street was occupied in 1953 by Messrs E J Elliott (Wireless) Limited, radio and television engineers and dealers.

Number 23 York Street was occupied in 1953 by Messrs B Pooley and Sons Limited, bakers..

Number 24 York Street was occupied in 1953 by Miss G M Matthews, confectioner.

Number 25 York Street was occupied in 1953 by Mr R Edgccumbe trading as Samuel Edgcumbe, jeweller.

Number 26 York Street was occupied in 1953 by Mr J L  Hodder, grocer.

Number 27 York Street was occupied in 1953 by Mrs  M Haughins, ladies' hairdresser.

Numbers 28 and 29 York Street was occupied in 1953 by Millett's Stores (1928) Limited, outfitters, and the National Deposit Friendly Society, run by the resident district secretary, Mr Albert

Number 30 York Street was occupied in 1953 by Mr George Miller, seed merchant.

Number 31 York Street was either empty or derelict in 1953.

Number 32 York Street was occupied in 1953 by Mrs A S Phipps and Mrs N C Woodmancy trading as Lavinia, ladies' outfitters.

Number 33 York Street was occupied in 1953 by Mr William R Beer, confectioner.

Number 34 York Street was occupied in 1953 by Mr H Goddard's cafe and Messrs Pettitt and Coakley, accountants.

Number 35 York Street was occupied in 1953 by a private resident.

Number 36 York Street was occupied in 1953 by Mrs Olive Badock, the Newtown Hotel.  The  premises next door were Number 46 Cobourg Street.

The junction of York Street (left) with Cobourg Street in 1960.
The Newtown Hotel was the last building in York Street.
  Plymouth City Museum and Art Gallery.

Returning down the eastern side, the first property that survived the Blitz and remained in 1953, apart from a telephone call box, was Number 40 York Street, The Oporto Public House.

Numbers 43 and 44 York Street in 1953 were occupied by Messrs Baudains' Limited, house furnishers.

William Street joined York Street at this point.

By 1953 Numbers 45 to 54 York Street inclusive had been demolished.

Number 55 York Street, which was occupied in 1953 by Messrs Viner, Carew and Company, chartered auctioneers and estate agents, land agents, surveyors and valuers.

Number 56 York Street was occupied in 1953 by Messrs Waygood-Otis Limited, lift manufacturers, along with the office of the Electrical Trades Union (Devon and  Cornwall Area).

Number 57 York Street was occupied in 1953 by the People's Book Centre.

Number 58 York Street was occupied in 1953 by the Plymouth and South Devon Trustee Savings Bank.

Number 59 York Street was occupied in 1953 by the Plymouth Corporation Civil  Defence Department, of which Mr R Matheson MC was the Civil Defence Officer.

Number 60 York Street was occupied in 1953 by Mr William Roseveare MInstRA, architect.

Numbers 61 and 62 York Street were either not occupied in 1953 or were derelict.

Number 63 York Street was the South Western Hotel in 1953.