OLD PLYMOUTH . UK
www.oldplymouth.uk
 

  Brian Moseley, Plymouth
Webpage created: April 16, 2018
Webpage updated: April 16, 2018

        

TRAMWAYS IN OLD PLYMOUTH  |  PLYMOUTH, STONEHOUSE AND DEVONPORT TRAMWAYS COMPANY LIMITED

BOARD OF TRADE INSPECTION

Major Pringle, the Board of Trade's Inspector, carried out his inspection on Friday October 18th 1901, accompanied by Mr John Glenn, the engineer, Mr G H Moreton, the manager, and Mr C L Duke, the contractor for the permanent way.  Various officers from Plymouth and Devonport Borough Councils and East Stonehouse Urban District Council were also present.

Major Pringle and the representatives of Plymouth Council joined the tram at Bank of England Place and rumbled off to the Borough boundary at Manor Street (New Palace Theatre), where they were joined by the gentlemen from East Stonehouse and Devonport Councils.  A stop was made at Edgcumbe Street, where before the gauge was narrowed the District Council's water main had run down the centre of the track but was now buried underneath one of the lines.  The District Council's engineer felt that in the event of damage to the main, from whatever cause, the Company should help to defray the cost of repairs.  This they agreed to and the journey was resumed.

Speed restrictions were imposed by the Inspector.  The maximum speed in Devonport was to be 8mph, reducing to 4mph on all corners and 6mph in Saint Aubyn Street and Chapel Street and on Stonehouse Bridge.  In Edgcumbe Street and that part of Union Street within East Stonehouse, the speed was to be 6mph but 8mph was to be allowed in the Plymouth part of Union Street.

One other problem was highlighted during the inspection.  It had been found that when passing underneath the railway arch at Millbay, it had been possible for someone standing on the upper deck to touch the electric wires so these had been moved to the side out of reach.

The new electrified service commenced on Monday November 18th 1901.