OLD PLYMOUTH . UK
Plus parts of the South Hams and West Devon
www.oldplymouth.uk
 

  Brian Moseley, Plymouth
Webpage created: April 14, 2018
Webpage updated: May 30, 2018

        

RAILWAYS IN OLD PLYMOUTH  |  TURNCHAPEL BRANCH  /  YEALMPTON BRANCH
BRANCH LINE, FRIARY STATION TO TURNCHAPEL STATION
BRANCH LINE, PLYMOUTH STATION (MILLBAY) TO YEALMPTON STATION

PLYMSTOCK STATION  (POMPHLETT STATION)

Plymstock Station, at 3 miles 71 chains from Plymouth Station (Millbay) on the Yealmpton Branch and 1 mile 44 chains from Friary Station on the Turnchapel Branch, was officially opened on July 1st 1892 but the commencement of public passenger trains was delayed until September 5th 1892.  It was at that time known as Pomphlett Station.  The ruling gradient was 1 in 66 rising.

At will be noted from the map below that the line went in to the northern platform, later used by the trains to Yealmpton.  Furthermore, four chains back from Plymstock Station towards Friary was Plymstock Junction, where the line to Yealmpton left the Turnchapel Branch.  Thus the London and South Western Railway owned the first nine chains of what became the Yealmpton Branch, which officially began at the end of the northern platform.

Plymstock Station LSWR before the Yealmpton Branch
was constructed.
From  Ordnance Survey sheet CXXIV.9 dated 1892.

Plymstock Station layout in 1912.
Note the addition of Plymstock Junction and
Plymstock Signal Box.
From Ordnance Survey sheet CXXIV.9 dated 1912.

The Great Western Railway side of Plymstock Station circa 1910.
Note the lamp standard and the gradient post beneath the nameboard.
  Locomotive and General Railway Photographs.

Plymstock Signal Box was moved on to the Station platform in 1935 and both it and the booking office were destroyed by an incendiary bomb during the air raids on Plymouth during March 1941.  Both were quickly rebuilt in timber.

The last trains on the Turnchapel Branch called on September 10th 1951 and on the Yealmpton Branch on February 29th 1960 and only specials run by various enthusiast societies called after that.

According to the "The Official Hand-book of Station 1956" Plymstock Station dealt with goods traffic, parcels, miscellaneous traffic, furniture vans, carriages, motor cars, portable engines and machines on wheels, and live stock.  It was not equipped with a crane.

Plymstock Station was finally closed to goods traffic on or as from September 30th 1961 and Plymstock Signal Box was closed on or as from May 1st 1963, the remaining stub for the benefit of cement traffic being operated as a siding.