OLD PLYMOUTH . UK
www.oldplymouth.uk
 

  Brian Moseley, Plymouth
Webpage created: July 05, 2017.
Webpage updated: July 05, 2017

        

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LANYON'S or THE NEW CHURCH ALMSHOUSES

NEW CHURCH or LANYON'S ALMSHOUSES

Charles Church had only been completed in 1658, albeit without its spire, so it was very much the "New Church" when, in September 1674, Mr John Lanyon bequeathed 300 for the use of the poor people of the new parish and for building an almshouse.  In October 1678 the site in Green Street, right opposite the Church, was conveyed by Mr John Trelawney the elder to Mr John Martyn and others, acting for the Corporation, for the sum of 50 3s.  There were already some almshouses on the site and the Lanyon ones were built on what remained as a garden.  By an indenture dated September 26th 1680 the New Church Almshouses were conveyed by Martyn and his partners to the Corporation.

A tablet on the Almshouses stated that Mr John Gubbs had given 100 to the poor of Plymouth and that his executor, Mr Robert Gubbs, had put this towards the cost of erecting the New Church Almshouses.

Following the demolition of the "Old Church Twelve's" in 1868, these almshouses were rebuilt the following year with enlarged accommodation.  They remain on the same site opposite the remains of Charles Church, although now fronting the Charles Cross roundabout rather than in the peace and quiet formerly enjoyed when they were in Green Street.

The New Church Almshouses were transferred to the Guardians of the Poor in 1708.